Teaching Gardens

Community Garden History

The community gardens have provided a place for individuals and families to grow healthy, nutritious food while enjoying the pleasures and benefits of a natural setting. This opportunity was especially important to people who do not possess garden space of their own.

One of the first community garden started with the Macedonia Family Resource Center Mosaic Community Garden in 2010. The Macedonia Family Resource Center Mosaic Community Garden began through a partnership with Macedonia, Guilford Child Development, and GTCC.  Each year on MLK Day, volunteers come together to clear the garden for the upcoming year.  These volunteers consisted mainly of HPU Students and people from the city supporting the “Day of Service”.

The Southside Community Garden followed in 2014. The 20 plots in the Southside Community Garden was developed to meet the needs of this neighborhood who came together to grow fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs, on common ground. The Southside Neighborhood Association along with Family Service of the Piedmont (Fairview Family Resource Center), Fairview Elementary School, Guilford County Health Department, NC Cooperative Agriculture Extension Master Gardeners and the City of High Point (Parks and Recreation and Community Development & Housing Department) collaborated to make a dream come true for the neighborhood.

The Oakview Community Garden received a grant from Blue Cross Blue Shield and NCRPA in 2012. The garden is maintained by the City of High Point Parks & Recreation Department with a lot of neighborhood participation.

The West End Bountiful Harvest Community Garden was started in 2015 by one of HPU VISTA students after meeting with the community for about a year. Bountiful Harvest has been a bright spot for people in the community for many years and for many more to come.

Through High Point University’s Americorps VISTA program, the Hayden-Harman Foundation facilitated the development of the Cedar Street, Howard Street, and RC Baldwin Avenue gardens in early 2016. All three gardens have expanded since they first began. All three gardens have a shed for tools. All three have had stable leadership which has enabled them to flourish.

The East Avenue garden started in early 2017 with 10 raised beds. The Foundation facilitates monthly community garden leader meetings to support the gardens. Growing High Point also provides assistance to community garden leaders to bring additional resources to support their continued development.

The Burns Hill Community Garden first (20) beds were built on April 24, 2016. In January 2020 we added 10 more beds for a total of 30 now at our garden. Our plans are to add 10 more in April 2021. We hold our National Night Out, Community BBQ and other community events at our garden. The garden has been a community rally place for those in need of food or other resources.

 Community gardens has become very popular in the City of High Point. It has taken the collaboration and partnership of many organizations and volunteers to bring people together and provide fresh produce and a healthy way to eat. 

 

Macedonia

One of the first community garden started with the Macedonia Family Resource Center Mosaic Community Garden in 2010. The Macedonia Family Resource Center Mosaic Community Garden began through a partnership with Macedonia, Guilford Child Development, and GTCC.  At the time, Macedonia offered ESL classes for local refugees new to America and North Carolina.  The classes were held 3-nights per week with a certified English instructor. Children of the participants were cared for by Bonner students from High Point University, the instructors were provided by GTCC.  A survey was offered to the participants with the purpose of seeing how to assist them and make their lives easier.  The response from the refugees was overwhelming, most of them wanted the ability to grow foods from their native countries.   At this point, Macedonia Resource Center cleared a portion of land from the right side of the building to prepare for a garden.  Initially, there were no raised beds, just a large open space where many various vegetables were grown by individual families.  The plan was a poor decision from the start.  There were no boundaries to separate the different vegetables, with food and weeds were growing wildly everywhere.  Eventually, Macedonia Resource Center decided to revamp the project and come up with a much better plan. Three seasons went by before making the changes and everyone could not be happier. The land was cleared once again and raised beds were put in place.  The garden began with 30-boxes during the 2014 season thanks to a donation from Beeson’s Lumber.  Each box was numbered and assigned to individual families accordingly.  

The garden was quickly becoming one of the more popular programs at Macedonia with a demand for additional boxes each year.   In 2017, an additional 10-boxes were added bringing the total to 40-raised garden boxes.  Later in 2017, Macedonia Resource Center was blessed with an onsite garden shed donated by the City of High Point’s Community Development and Housing Department. This shed was constructed by a program operated by High Point Community Against Violence (HPCAV).  This blessing allowed the center to lock up their tools onsite for the families to use.  

Each year on MLK Day, volunteers come together to clear the garden for the upcoming year.  These volunteers consisted mainly of HPU Students and people from the city supporting the “Day of Service”.

Macedonia’s garden remains as strong as ever although, there was a small decline in usage during this Pandemic year.

 

Southside Community Garden

The Southside Community Garden followed in 2014. The 20 plots in the Southside Community Garden was developed to meet the needs of this neighborhood who came together to grow fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs, on common ground. The Southside Neighborhood Association along with Family Service of the Piedmont (Fairview Family Resource Center), Fairview Elementary School, Guilford County Health Department, NC Cooperative Agriculture Extension Master Gardeners and the City of High Point (Parks and Recreation and Community Development & Housing Department) collaborated to make a dream come true for the neighborhood.   

The gardens served as a catalyst for bringing people together and improving the neighborhood. The garden committee was successful this year by selling 20 out of 20 plots. The garden also help build a stronger neighborhood, taught life skills, allowed residents to save money, promoted healthy living habits and much more.  The Neighborhood Association was able to harvest over 100 pounds of collard greens, lettuce, mustard greens, kale, and sweet potatoes the first year, under the leadership of the garden coordinator and his family.   This family is the reason the garden was so successful. They had the passion to do the work and made sure fresh produce was available to anyone who needed it. One plot was used to give fruits and vegetables to a shelter and neighbors in need.

Fairview Family Resource Center brought several plots for the youth to learn about gardening and healthy living and harvest an abundant of fruits and vegetables. The gardens serve as an outside classroom for the youth attending the Fairview Family Resource Center.

High Point LEAP partnered with the Southside Community Garden in 2017. They rented 10 plots in the Southside Community Garden, which was half the garden space. LEAP’s Americorps Vista staff attended several High Point garden leader meetings to learn more about gardening and to find available volunteers. They reached out to the NC Cooperative Extension office in Guilford County for advice/information about starting a garden and involving children in the gardening experience.  They worked to recruit youth and adult volunteers to clean up the garden and plant the seeds for crops. LEAP was awarded a grant through the NC Cooperative Extension for $250 to buy supplies for the garden and also received $400 in gifts-in-kind to start the process. As a result, the garden produced fresh produce including tomatoes, squash, string beans. This was the first time many of the children in the LEAP program had the opportunity to help plant seeds, see a garden grow and experience eating fresh vegetables from the garden.  Additional produce was provided to the families in the LEAP program during the summer camp. A garden curriculum was included with the produce, and the 100 students attending the summer camp had a chance to learn more about gardening and experienced working in the garden each week.

Garden supplies were also donated to the Southside Community Garden by a private company. The City of High Point Community Development & Housing provided the land, purchased the fence, which was installed by Parks & Recreations staff and made sure water was provided to the garden. 

Volunteers come together through out the year to help clean the garden and prepare it for the planting season. These volunteers consisted mainly of the neighborhood association members, High Point LEAP, Growing High Point, and HPU Students (VISTA and Bonner) and other individuals supporting the “Day of Service”.

 

Oakview Community Garden

The Oakview Community Garden received a grant from Blue Cross Blue Shield and NCRPA in 2012. Guilford County Cooperative Extension also received funding from the High Point Community Foundation that was used for the Oakview garden as well. The garden is maintained by the City of High Point Parks & Recreation Department with a lot of neighborhood participation.  An onsite garden shed donated by the City of High Point’s Community Development and Housing Department. This shed was constructed by a program operated by High Point Community Against Violence (HPCAV).  

 

The West End Bountiful Harvest Community Garden

The West End Bountiful Harvest Community Garden was started in 2015 by one of HPU VISTA students after meeting with the community for about a year. West End Ministries in a joint effort with the community was able to lease land from the City of High Point Community Development & Housing Department in August of 2015.  They were able to start clearing the land to prepare for the garden. In 2016, they hired the first garden coordinator.  The garden began to blossom with raised beds, vegetables, and fruits.  A playground and picnic area were constructed because it was important to the community to have a place to go with their families and children. In 2019 a new garden coordinator was hired and brought more awareness to the garden, more of the community participation along with more playground equipment. In 2020 the current garden coordinator was hired, who has brought in more garden experience. Bountiful Harvest has over 30 raised beds that the community uses to plant and harvest for themselves.  There are beds set aside where anyone in the community can come and gather fresh produce. There are over 10 fruit trees like apples and pears; a 20 ×40 shelter with picnic tables, 3 different playgrounds for children of all ages and benches throughout the garden/park for people to come and relax. Bountiful Harvest has been a bright spot for people in the community for many years and for many more to come.

 

Burns Hill Community Garden

The Burns Hill Community Garden first (20) beds were built on April 24, 2016. In January 2020 we added 10 more beds for a total of 30 now at our garden. Our plans are to add 10 more in April 2021. We hold our National Night Out, Community BBQ and other community events at our garden. The garden has been a community rally place for those in need of food or other resources.